Black Lives Matter

black lives matter

Hi friends,

The last week in America has been heavy. A black man named George Floyd was murdered by police in broad daylight, and the country finally decided that enough was enough. It was also Breonna Taylor’s would-have-been 27th birthday this week, which I shared more about here.

We are at a tipping point in our country, and I’m very hopeful that there will be some real change soon. 

As a biracial woman with a large platform and lots of privilege (we’ll unpack this later), I would not be able to live with myself if I stayed silent. I’ve been sharing lots of resources and statements about my thoughts on racism in America, police brutality, diversity, and more on Instagram over the last week, but I thought it was important to publish this content onto my blog to live forever.

I hope you’ve taken the last week to learn, listen and put together a plan of action for the future. I’ve been reading this book “So You Want to Talk About Race” and have learned SO much. I highly recommend reading! Feel free to message me on Instagram if you’d like to discuss. 

Here’s my statement on black lives matter.

I couldn’t sleep last night. I woke up, donated to @mnfreedomfund@reclaimtheblock & @blackvisionscollective…and now I have some things to say. I’ve been struggling to put words to how I feel about the killing of unarmed black people, police brutality and systemic racism in the US…but here are my thoughts:

As a bi-racial woman, I’ve struggled with understanding the perception of my racial identity. Growing up, I was always 1 or 2 of the only brown kids in my class. I first experienced racism was when I was 5 years old. My white, blonde-haired mom came to pick me up from school, and a group of kids decided that I was adopted…and taunted me about it for months. 

Then came the “you’re so white,” “you don’t act like other black people” and “you’re an oreo” comments. At the time, I thought they were compliments. I didn’t have many black friends and thought these sentiments were normal.

It wasn’t until I started having significantly more black friends in college and postgrad that I truly began to understand covert racism. I started to learn that racism didn’t have to be blatant. It could be super subtle, to the point where you don’t even notice it if you don’t want to. I also started to realize that if a racist person wanted to do me harm, they would not care that I’m half German & French and that I “acted white.”

Saying ignorant things, no matter your intention, is harmful and supports false stereotypes about black people. Black people are smart, educated, articulate and successful, too. These characteristics are not synonymous with “acting white” or whiteness.

We deserve life. We deserve respect. We deserve freedom. Racism is alive and ingrained into our society, and we MUST do better. I stand with #GeorgeFloyd#BreonnaTaylor and every black person in history who has been persecuted by systemic racism. I believe that #blacklivesmatter

If you have black friends, now is your time to show up for them. Call, text and message them and let them know you care. Check yourself, check your family/friends, fill your feed with more black creators, support black owned businesses, support black causes & be ANTI-racist. We have a lot of work to do.✊🏽💕

Thank you for reading, and I hope we can work together in this fight against racism.

Xo,

aryann harrell blog fashion wine

Follow:
Share:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *